Umpire Q+A Archive

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Cricket Umpire Q+A is where you can read the answers  to cricket umpiring questions that have been submitted to the experienced umpire who manages this umpiring web page. The answers have been updated to include changes to the laws coming into effect on October 1, 2017.

 

 

 

 

Q1: (Law 17): A nervous bowler delivers a series of wides and no balls. After ten deliveries, only two are legitimate. The team captain wants to replace him with another bowler to complete the over. Should you allow this?

A: Not unless the bowler suffers an injury or is suspended by the umpire.


Q2: (Laws 25.6/38): An injured batter who has been using a runner forgets about the runner and takes off for a quick single. He makes his ground before the stumps are broken but the runner does not. The fielding team appeals for the run-out. What is your decision?

A: The injured batter is out on appeal. Both the batter and the runner must have made their ground.


Q3: (Law 38): The wicketkeeper knocks a bail off the wicket while waiting to gather the ball. Both batters are stranded at the other end of the pitch. Seeing this, one of the batters runs to the wicketkeeper’s end. The wicketkeeper collects the ball and breaks the wicket and appeals for the run out. The batter claims he can’t be out because the wicket was first broken when the wicketkeeper didn’t have the ball and therefore the ball was ‘dead’. What is your decision?

A: Out! The ball is not dead and because one bail remained on the wicket. Removing it is enough to break the wicket.


Q4: (Law 28.2.2): A fielder dives to stop a ball crossing the boundary. As he does so his hat falls off and the ball stops on top of the hat inside the boundary. The batsmen run three but claim a boundary should have been signalled plus five penalty runs. Do you signal the boundary and the penalty runs because of illegal fielding?

A: No. This was accidental. He did not deliberately throw the hat at the ball to stop the boundary. The three runs should stand.


Q5: (Law 33.2.2): A batter skies a ball which hits a bird and falls just inside the boundary where it is caught. The fielding teams appeals for the catch whereas the batter claims it should be signalled as six because it would have cleared the boundary if it hadn’t hit the bird. What is your decision?

A: Out! A very unlucky batter (and bird).


Q6: (Law 37.1): A batter mishits a ball into the covers. The cover field positions himself to take the catch when the batter yells out ‘drop it’. The fielder does drop it. The fielding team appeals for unfair play. What is your decision?

A: Out for obstructing the field. plus five penalty runs  to the fielding side. (Law Change from October 2017).


Q7: (Law 37.1): The non-striking batsman takes off for a risky single. Realising the mid-on fielder is about to throw at the batting end stumps the non-striker runs down the middle of the pitch to obscure the stumps. The ball hits the batter and ricochets to the boundary for four overthrows. The fielding team appeals for obstruction. The batting team insists it’s five runs as the action wasn’t deliberate. What is your decision?

A: Out obstructing the field! Batters are required to run between the wickets off to the side of the pitch so his action is considered to be deliberate.


Q8: (Law 25.1): A batter suffers a muscle injury and asks for a runner. The 12th man comes out to act as the runner. The captain of the fielding team objects to the 12th man acting as the runner. What is your decision?

A: The fielding team captain is correct. The 12th man cannot act as a runner. The runner should be a member of the team who has already batted. If the openers are still in then one of the lower order batters should act as the runner.


Q9: (Law 32): A fast bowler surprises the facing batter by releasing the ball five metres short of the bowling crease. The surprised batter is bowled, but claims he should not be out as the bowler has used unfair tactics in delivering the ball while so short of the creases. What is your decision?

A: Out bowled! Once the bowler has commenced his run up the ball is live. The umpire only has to decide whether the batter was ready and that the bowler did not deliver the ball outside the return crease.


Q10: (Law 41): A new batter takes up his stance as a right-hander. The fielding captain sets his field accordingly. Just before the bowler releases the ball the batter changes to a left-hander’s stance and hits the ball through a gap to the boundary. The fielding captain complains that this is unfair play and it should have been called dead ball. What is your decision?

A: Award the runs. This is not unfair play.


Q11: (Law 41.5): A batter who is attempting a quick single is watching the ball and collides with the bowler who is standing watching the play. They both fall to the ground. The batter is run out at the wicketkeeper’s end. The batter claims he was obstructed by the bowler and should not be given out. What is your decision?

A: Out! It is the batter’s responsibility to avoid the bowler while running between the wickets. There is no evidence that the bowler moved to obstruct the batter.


Q12: (Law 18.6): It is the last ball of a 50-over match. The batting team is nine wickets down and needs one run to win. The last ball is bowled and the batter moves out of his crease to attempt an on drive, but misses the ball. The wicketkeeper removes the bails and appeals to the square leg umpire for the stumping. The square leg umpire gives him out. Meanwhile the bowler’s end umpire has signalled wide. The fielding team believes the match has been tied, while the batting team believes it has won because the wide call happened before the stumping. Who is correct?

A: The batting team is correct. The match was won when the bowler’s end umpire signalled wide. The stumping is irrelevant.


Q13: (Law 20): A batter takes a quick single. The stumps are thrown down and the fielding team appeals for the run out. The umpire believes the batter just made his ground and declines the appeal. Meanwhile the ball, after hitting the stumps, deflected off the batter and went to the boundary. The fielding team believes the four runs should be disallowed for two reasons. The first because the ball should be dead after hitting the stumps, the second because the ball deflected off the batter. What is your decision?

A: The runs should be allowed. The ball would only have become dead if the run out appeal had been given out.


Q14: (Law 20): The ball is hit hard back down the off side of the pitch. The bowler attempts to stop it with his foot, but the ball ricochets off the bowler’s foot, hits the umpire’s left knee and then hits the stumps, removing the bails. The non-striking batter is out of his ground. The fielding team appeals for the run out. What is your decision?

A: Out! Unlucky for the batter but the ball is not dead just because it hits the umpire.


Q15: (Law 37): The batter’s take a quick single to a ball that is dropped down just in front of the batter’s crease. The non-striker nudges the ball away from the bowler who is attempting to kick it on to the stumps for the run-out. The fielding team appeals for obstruction; the batter claims it was an accident. What is your decision?

A: Out, obstructing the field! As the ball was not threatening the stumps neither batter has any right to touch it.


Q16:  A bowler who has a reputation for bowling front-foot no-balls, asks the umpire to tell him if he is in danger of over-stepping the line. The batter claims it is not your job as umpire to tell the bowler. What is your reply?

A: Advise the batter that it is quite within your rights as an umpire to tell the bowler when he is in danger of infringing.


Q17: (Law 19): Two fielders chase a ball to the boundary. The first dives to stop the ball and manages to stop it just just short of the line, but is left lying halfway over the boundary line. The second fielder slips as he picks up the ball and accidentally steps on his team-mate who is still lying on the boundary line. The batters run three but claim a boundary should have been awarded. What is your decision?

A: Boundary four! Although the second fielder is legally in play, he is touching an object, his team-mate, who is touching the boundary rope.


Q18: (Law 29): A batter plays and misses the ball which hits the off stump. The bail briefly pops up off the stumps but falls back in place. The fielding team appeals for bowled. What is your decision?

A: Not out! The bail(s) must be permanently dislodged from the stumps.


Q19: (Laws 34/37): A batter attempts a sweep shot but edges the ball which bounces up off his pad and lobs up behind him. Thinking that the ball is about to fall on his stumps, the batter knocks it away with his bat, just as the wicketkeeper is about to catch the ball. The fielding team appeals believing that the batter is out hit the ball twice. What is your decision?

A: Out, but for obstructing the field! The batter is allowed to legally hit the ball twice to prevent the ball hitting his stumps but not if it prevents a fielder from taking a catch.


Q20: (Law 31.3): On the last ball of an over a batter is struck on the pad. No one appeals. The umpire wonders why no one appealed as he was going to give it out, then calls over. While walking to the other end the wicketkeeper tells the captain he reckons the batter was plumb lbw. The fielding team captain then appeals for lbw. Can the umpire still give the batter out?

A: Yes, providing the next bowler has not started his run-up.


Q21: (Law 24.1): An out-fielder is injured while fielding a ball. The 12th man, who is an expert 1st slip fielder, comes on to the field and goes to 1st slip. The batters complain, arguing that he should field in the out-field like the injured fielder. What is your decision?

A: The batters have no say in this matter. The 12th man can field anywhere except as wicketkeeper, unless he has the approval of the umpires.


Q22: (Law 13.4): The two captains and the umpires are in the middle for the toss. No-one has a coin. The home captain offers to toss the bat he is carrying and have the visiting captain call bat face up or face down. Do you allow this?

A: Yes, as long as the visiting captain agrees. If he does not, a coin must be found.


Q23: (Law 5.6): A batter comes to the wicket wearing only the bottom hand batting glove. First ball he is struck on the top hand wrist with a red mark being visible. The ball is caught in the gully. If he had been wearing a glove on that hand it would have struck the glove. The fielding team appeals for the catch. The batter claims he can’t be out because the ball hit him on the wrist. What is your decision?

A: Not out. As the ball did not strike his hand holding the bat he cannot be out caught.


Q24: (Law 28.5): It is late in the afternoon and close fielders’ shadows are falling on the pitch. The batters ask that they be moved back so that no shadows are in the batter’s eye line. What is your decision?

A: The fielders do not have to move. There is nothing in the laws preventing stationary shadows on the pitch. However, if the fielder’s are moving while the ball is being delivered you will have to take action and have the fielders moved back. If you believe the fielders are moving deliberately to distract the batter, you can warn them and on a further occasion award five penalty runs to the batting team for illegal play.


Q25: (Law 33.3): A batter mishits a simple catch back to the bowler. In his excitement the bowler lobs the ball into the air at the same moment as catching it. He drops the ball when it comes down. The batter stands his ground claiming the catch had not been completed. What is your decision?

A: Not out! The bowler at no time had control of the ball.


Q26: (Law 19.2.7): A spectator steps into the field of play and prevents a ball from clearing the boundary by dropping it in front of him. A fielder then picks up the ball and throws it back to the stumps. The batters run three. What is your decision?

A: It is either four or six. The umpire has to decide whether the ball would have cleared the boundary on the full (six) or crossed the boundary line (four).


Q27: (Laws 20.4/41.4): The bowler is wearing different coloured shoes. The batter complains, claiming he can’t concentrate because of this. What is your decision?

A: There is no law against wearing different coloured shoes. The bowler can continue to bowl in those shoes.


Q28: In a desperate attempt to break a long partnership, the fielding team’s wicketkeeper takes off his pads and gloves and comes on to bowl. He immediately takes a wicket to break the partnership. At the end of the over he advises the umpires that he is going to resume wicketkeeping. Do you allow this?

A: Yes, you allow it.


Q29: (Law 20.4.2.2): A fielder falls awkwardly in unsuccessfully trying to take a catch and cries out in pain as he lies on the ground. There is no other fielder near the injured player so the batters keep running and complete another two runs before another fielder returns the ball to the wicketkeeper. The fielding captain claims the two extra runs should not be allowed because the umpire should have immediately called ‘dead ball’ when it was obvious the fielder was injured. Is he correct?

A: He is correct. Only the runs completed or a run in progress where the batters have already crossed should be allowed in the case of a fielder’s injury.


Q30: (Law 25.4.3): A batter is hit on the pads, but no-one on the fielding team appeals. Two balls later the batter takes a single and asks the bowling end umpire if he would have been given out on appeal two balls earlier. The umpire says he would have been given out. The batter, known for his good sportsmanship, announces he is giving himself out and leaves the field of play. What should the umpire do?

A: The umpire should tell the scorers and the fielding captain that the batter is ‘retired out’. The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.


Q31: (Law 24.2): A fielder is signing an autograph just outside the boundary rope, not realizing the ball has been bowled. He is alerted by shouts of ‘catch it’ from his team-mates and notices the ball traveling towards him. He steps back inside the field of play and takes the catch. The batter claims he should not be given out as the fielder was not in the field of play when the ball was bowled. What is your decision?

A: Out caught! The fielder is not officially off the field of play and the two umpires would have been concentrating on the action in the middle and so would not have noticed the fielder’s position.


Q32: (Law 41.13): There is one delivery left in the match. The batting team is nine wickets down and needs two runs to win. The bowler has previously received a final warning from the umpire for running on the pitch. He bowls the last ball which the batter edges to the wicket keeper who drops the catch. The bowler shows his annoyance by kicking the pitch, dislodging a large chunk of turf. Meanwhile the batters attempt a quick single but the first slip picks up the ball and throws down the stumps at the bowling end running out the striking batter. Both teams claim to have won the match (the batting team claims five penalty runs for the bowler deliberately damaging the pitch). What is your decision?

A: As the damaging of the pitch occurred before the run-out, the five run penalty applies and the batting team wins the match by one wicket. Under the new 2017 Laws the 5-run penalty no longer applies so the fielding team wins the match due to the run-out.


Q33: (Law 31.6): A delivery narrowly misses the batter’s off-stump just as a gust of wind blows across the pitch. The off bail falls to the ground. The fielding team appeals for bowled but the batter claims it was the wind gust that dislodged the bail. What is your decision?

A: Not out! As there is doubt about what happened the benefit of that doubt must go to the batter.


Q34: (Law 24): A player has been off the field for 40 minutes having treatment for a muscle strain. He returns to the field, but 20 minutes after returning he is asked to bowl. The batters object claiming he cannot bowl until he has been on the field for the same amount of time he has been off the field? Are they correct?

A: The batters are correct. The umpires will have noted the times of the fielder’s absence and return. Often there is a fifteen minute grace period where there is no time penalty, but in this case the fifteen minute grace period has been exceeded. (Law Change from October 2017).


Q35: (Competition Playing Conditions): A fast bowler bowls a bouncer which the umpire calls wide as it passes the batter above head height in the upright position, Next ball he does it again. On the last ball of the over the bowler bowls another bouncer at the batter who fends it off in front of his face and is caught in the gully. The fielding team claims the catch. What is your decision?

A: Not out and no ball! The bowler has exceeded the limit of a maximum of two bouncers per over.


Q36: (Law 41.2): A bowler is wearing a watch. The facing batter claims that the sun is glaring off the watch face and distracting him. What is your decision?

A: Insist that the bowler remove the watch.


Q37: (Law 35): A batter plays a dead bat defensive shot and drops the ball at his feet. The batter bends down to pick up the ball to return it to the bowler but slips and stands on his stumps dislodging the bails. The fielding team appeals for hit wicket. What is your decision?

A: Not out! The batter dislodged the bails after he completed his stroke and was not setting off for a run.


Q38: (Law 33): A wicketkeeper places his helmet behind him at the start of an over. On the fourth ball of the over the batter edges a bouncer towards the wicketkeeper. The wicketkeeper accidentally stands on the helmet and takes the catch at full stretch above his head. The batter claims he should not be given out as the wicketkeeper gained an unfair advantage by standing on the helmet. What is your decision?

A: Out caught! As the ball did not hit the helmet he must be given out.


Q39: (Law 31): The batter plays at a spinning ball. The wicketkeeper appeals to the bowler’s end umpire for the catch, but at the same time whips off the bails for a stumping. He does not appeal to the square leg umpire. The bowling end umpire says not out and calls over but the point fielder alerts the bowling end umpire to the square leg’s umpire raised finger. The batter claims he cannot be out as no-one appealed to the square leg umpire and in any case over had been called. What is your decision?

A: Out stumped! Any appeal covers all possible methods of dismissal and both umpires. The call of ‘over’ does not prevent the decision being given.


Q40: (Law 41.16): A facing batter is on 99. His partner has been backing up before the bowler has released the ball, annoying the bowler. The bowler decides he has had enough of this and while running in for his next delivery throws at the non-striker’s wicket but misses and the ball travels towards the batter who hits it to the boundary and claims his century. What is your signal?

A: Dead ball! Unfortunately for the batter does not get the chance to score off an attempted run out by the bowler.


Q41: (Law 21.1): An ambidextrous spin bowler bowls the first four balls of an over right arm over the wicket. He then informs the umpire he is going to bowl around the wicket. To the surprise of the batter he delivers the next ball with his left arm, clean bowling the bemused batter. The batter complains to the umpire that he can’t be out as he wasn’t informed about the change of bowling arm. What is your decision?

A: Not out and no ball. The bowler must tell the umpire about any change in his mode of delivery.


Q42: (Law 27.3): A slow bowler tempts a batter out of his crease. The batter misses the ball, but the wicketkeeper, in his haste to effect the stumping, slips forward and takes the ball in front of the stumps before removing the bails. He appeals to the square leg umpire for the stumping. What is your decision?

A: Not out! The wicketkeeper is not allowed to take the ball in front of the stumps unless it has first touched the batter’s body, equipment or bat, before the ball rests in the wicketkeeper’s gloves. The striker’s end umpire will call and signal no-ball for the infringement.


Q43: (Law 21.6): A bowler knocks one of the bails off the stumps as he delivers the ball. The batter is bowled but claims the umpire should have called ‘dead ball’. What is your decision?

A: Not out but ‘no ball’. The law has changed recently to make this event a ‘no ball’.


Q44: (Law 29.3): The batters take a quick single. A fielder throws at the bowler’s end stumps, knocking all three stumps out of the ground. The ball ricochets into the outfield and the batters attempt another quick run. The ball is thrown back to the fielder standing where the three stumps are lying on the ground. The fielder catches the ball with the batter running to that end short of his ground. The bowler, in his frustration, throws the ball on the ground and complains to the umpire that the ball should have been called dead when the three stumps were knocked over. What is your decision?

A: You allow the second run. The ball remains ‘live’. The fielder could have remade the wicket.


Q45: (Laws 31.6/31.8): The batters attempt a quick run. The fielder injures his previously damaged finger as he attempts to pick up the ball before throwing it at the stumps and cries out ‘no’. One of the batters thinks the ‘no’ call came from his partner stops running and attempts to return to his ground. He is run out. What is your decision?

A: A wise umpire will call ‘dead ball’ and go and discuss the situation with his colleague. The injured fielder has not deliberately obstructed the batters with the ‘no’ call, so the batter can be given out but it would be wise to ask the fielding captain if he wishes to go ahead with the appeal because of the obvious confusion it has caused the batters. If the fielding captain wishes to go ahead with the appeal the batter must be given out.


Q46: (Law 20.4.2): A spin bowler with a very short run up tries a variation on his normal approach to the wicket. He starts a delivery directly behind the umpire where the facing batter cannot see him. The batter is surprised by this and is clean bowled. Do you allow the dismissal?

A: If you feel the batter was not ready for the delivery you should disallow the dismissal and call and signal ‘dead ball’.


Q47: (Law 37.2): The batters take a quick single. The batter running to the danger end slides his bat when well out of his crease. The toe of the bat hit a divot on the pitch and is deflected off-line, hitting the base of the stumps and knocking off the bails a split second before the ball hits the stumps. The fielding team appeals. What is your decision?

A: As the bat hit the stumps before the ball the batter can’t be run out. You, as the umpire, must then decide whether the batter’s action was deliberate and then became a form of obstruction. In this case it seems the action was unintentional, so ‘not out’ for obstruction.


Q48: (Appendix 2.5/Law 37.1.2):  A fast bowler bowls a bouncer to the batter who takes his top hand off the bat to protect his face. The ball brushes his glove and is caught by the wicketkeeper. The fielding team appeals for the catch. What is your decision?

A: Not out. As the hand was not holding the bat he cannot be given out caught. He cannot be given out ‘handled the ball’ as his action was defensive to protect himself from injury. He was not deliberately trying to stop the ball hitting his wicket.


Q49: (Law 41.16): A slow bowler, frustrated by the non-striker repeatedly leaving his crease before the ball is bowled, holds on to the ball in his delivery stride and flicks his hand back and knocks the bails off and appeals for the run-out. What is your decision?

A: Not out. The bowler can only run-out the non-striker before his back foot lands in his delivery stride. In this case his back foot had landed in his delivery stride.


Q50: (Law 18.10): A batter goes for a big hit off a spin bowler but loses his grip on the bat just as the ball hits the bat. The ball goes to the boundary for four runs. Do you allow the boundary?

A: Yes, four runs. If you felt that the batter had deliberately thrown the bat at the ball you would call and signal ‘dead ball’ and warn the batter for unfair play.


Q51: (Law 33.5): A batter hits the ball on the full back to the bowler. The bowler tries to catch it but it deflects off his fingers and knocks off one of the bails with the non-striker out of his ground. The ball then flies in the air to mid-off where it is caught. The fielding team appeals. Which batter is out?

A: Both appeals would have been valid but there can be only one dismissal. In this case the caught takes precedence over the run out.


Q52: (Law 27.1): It is a freezing cold day and one of the fielding team, unnoticed by the umpires and batters puts on a pair of inner gloves while fielding on the boundary. Shortly afterwards the ball is hit in his direction and the fielder dives to stop a four and returns the ball to the wicketkeeper. It is then that the umpires notice that the fielder was wearing inner gloves. What is your decision?

A: Five penalty runs to the batting team plus those already completed when the fielder intercepted the ball. Only the wicketkeeper can wear any form of gloves while the ball is live.


Q53: (Law 19.3): An outfielder dives to save a boundary and accidentally moves the boundary rope a metre back. The ball bounces on his body and falls to the ground in the space where the boundary rope previously rested. The batting team claims that four runs should be awarded as a boundary would have been scored if the fielder had not moved the boundary rope. What is your decision.?

A: It is not a boundary. The actions of the fielder were not deliberate in moving the boundary rope. It is a boundary (Law Change from October 2017).


Q54: (Law 41.19.1): A spin bowler injures his spinning finger while fielding the ball. He goes off for treatment and returns with some tape on his finger. He then starts bowling again. The batters object, claiming that the bowler is getting an unfair advantage from having the tape on his finger. What is your decision?

A: You should ask the bowler to remove the tape if the bowler objects.


Q55: (Law 28.2): A batter glances the ball down towards fine-leg. The wicketkeeper throws off both his gloves and runs after the ball, picks it up and throws it back to the stumps where the first slip is waiting, wearing the wicketkeeper’s gloves. The fielder catches the ball, breaks the stumps and appeal for a run out as the batter is just short of his ground. What is your decision?

A: Not out and five penalty runs to the batting team, plus any completed runs plus the run in progress if the batters have crossed. The ball will not count as one in the over. The slip fielder is not permitted to put on the discarded wicketkeeper’s gloves. This is an example of illegal fielding.


Q56: (Law 33): A batter hits a lofted cover drive which hits the silly mid-off fielder in the helmet and rebounds to gully where it is caught. The fielding team appeals for the catch. What is your decision?

A: Not out. A batter cannot be out caught or run out if the ball strikes a fielder’s helmet and rebounds on to the stumps. Out (Law Change from October 2017).


Q57: (Law 41.4): A wicketkeeper is repeatedly talking loudly while keeping up to the stumps as the bowler is walking back to his bowling mark. The batters complain, stating it is making it hard for them to concentrate. What is your decision?

A: If you agree with the batters ask the wicketkeeper to stop. If he does not, award five runs to the batting team for unfair play.


Q58: (Law 31.7): A batter edges the ball behind and believing he has been caught starts walking off. However, the wicketkeeper dropped the catch. Noticing that the batter has left his ground, the wicketkeeper picks up the ball and removes the bails and appeals for run out. What is your decision?

A: Not out, dead ball. The batter left his ground under a misapprehension so cannot be given out run out in this instance.


Q59: (Law 41.19): A fielder leaves his almost empty drink bottle just outside the boundary rope. It is a windy day and the bottle tips over and rolls a metre into the field of play. A ball is hit towards the boundary and hits the bottle, stopping short of the boundary. The batters have run two but claim it should be a boundary plus five penalty runs. What is your decision?

A: Award the five penalty runs and the boundary if you believe the ball would definitely have reached the boundary.


Q60: (Law 1.1): The two teams turn up with thirteen players each. They approach the umpires and ask to play a thirteen aside match. Do you agree to this request?

A: Yes, but remind the captains that only eleven players can be on the field at any one time.


Q61: (Law 32.2.2.1): A wicketkeeper, wearing a helmet, is standing up to the stumps. The batter top edges the ball and it sticks briefly in the keeper’s helmet. He quickly pulls it out and appeals for the catch. What is your decision?

A: Not out. As soon as the ball lodges in the keeper’s helmet grill it instantly becomes dead. Out (Law Change from October 2017).


Q62: (Law 37): A delivery is hit hard back down the wicket to the bowler who mis-fields it towards the stumps. The non-striking batter, who is out of his ground and concerned he is about to be run out, instinctively deflects the ball with his bat. The ball flies to the boundary. The fielding team appeals for obstruction. What is your decision?

A: Firstly, the umpire should consult with his partner before making a decision. If the umpires decide that the actions of the batter were deliberate, he must be given out for obstruction. No runs can ever be scored from an illegal action by a batter. If the umpires decide the non-striker’s actions were accidental then the batter is not out and the boundary will stand.


Q63: (Law 34.1): A batter attempts a hook shot but misses the ball, which hits his helmet and balloons in the air. The batter sees an opportunity and when the ball comes into reach hits it to the boundary. The fielder’s appeal for ‘hit the ball twice’, the batter doesn’t agree, claiming he clearly hit it only once. What is your decision?

A: The batter is out ‘hit the ball twice’. Playing at the ball and missing is classified as the first hit; the successful hit is the second. A batter can only legally hit the ball twice if the ball is threatening to hit his wicket.


Q64: (Law 38): A batter attempts a quick single. While attempting to slide his bat the throw from the outfield hits his bat with such force that it knocks the bat out of his hands. The ball then ricochets on to the stumps with the batter still out of his ground. The fielding team then appeals for the run out. What is your decision?

A: Out! Unlucky for the batter.


Q65: (Law 25.4.3): A batter reaches his century and retires to give others a bat. However, wickets quickly fall and the century maker returns to resume his innings. The fielding team objects. What is your decision?

A: The batter cannot resume his innings in this circumstance as the fielding captain has not given his/her consent. In effect, when he left the crease after scoring his century he ‘retired out’.


Q66: (Law 2.8): A few overs into a match, the umpires and players realise that the pitch is unfit to play on and is dangerous to the batters. What do you do?

A: If there is no possibility of re-starting the match on a different pitch, the match should be abandoned in the interests of player safety.


Q67: (Law 13.5): The toss is held in the middle. The winner of the toss tells the umpires and the opposition captain that he has had second thoughts about what to do and wants to consult with the rest of his team before deciding whether to bat or field. The opposition captain objects to this and demands an immediate decision. What is your decision?

A: Allow the toss-winning captain to consult his team-mates. He has up until 15 minutes before the start of play to make up his mind. The decision must be made without delay.


Q68: (Laws 18.8.2/25.6.6): The batting team needs two runs to win the match. Nine wickets are down and the facing batter is using a runner. The batter slogs the ball into the outfield and stands still just out of his crease. The other batter and the runner complete two runs. However the striking batter forgets he is out of his ground and starts to walk down the pitch to celebrate with the non-striker. A fielder throws down the stumps at the striker’s end and appeals for the run out. What is your decision?

A: The striker is out run out. The batter using a runner must stay in his crease the whole time the ball is live. However, one run has been legally scored so the match is a tie. Any runs completed in this circumstance are disallowed.


Q69: (Law 41.7): A spin bowler delivers an above waist-high full toss. The facing batter backs away to leg. The ball knocks off one of the bails and ricochets over the wicketkeeper and crosses the boundary rope, The fielding team appeals for the ‘bowled’ dismissal, the batter looks confused, unsure if he is out or not. What is your decision?

A: Not out, five no-balls to the batting team. As the ball passed the batter above waist-high it is an automatic ‘no ball’, whether it hits the stumps or not. As the ball was not struck by the batters and travelled to the boundary, four runs are added to the no ball.


Q70: (Law 29.3): It is a windy day. The batters take a quick single. A fielder underarms the ball at the stumps. Just before the ball hits the stumps the bails are blown off the stumps. The fielding team appeal for the run out. What is your decision?

A: Not out. A most unfortunate event for the fielder but he needed to either replace one or both bails before again knocking them off or he would have to remove one of the stumps with the ball held against the stump.


Q71: (Law 18.3): A batter makes his mark in front of the batting crease and takes guard in front of the crease line. He is at the non-striker’s end. He takes an easy single but does not make his ground over the crease line. Instead, he faces up to the next delivery in front of the crease. The fielding team claims a short run. What is your decision as square leg umpire?

A: It is not a short run as there was no deliberate attempt to run short. However, the fielding team could have run him out for not making his ground.


Q72: (Law 39.1): A batter is hit on the pads and the fielding team appeals for lbw. The umpire declines the appeal. The batter is standing just out of the batting crease adjusting his gloves. Noticing this, the wicketkeeper removes the bails and appeals for the stumping. What is your decision?

A: The batter is out, run out not stumped, but before you give your decision, ask the fielding captain if he wishes to continue with the appeal. The fielding team may decide in the ‘spirit of cricket’ not to continue with the appeal.


Q73: (Law 41.13): A bowler is warned by the umpire for running on and damaging the pitch. He continues to do this despite the warnings, The batters loudly complain and insist that you send him off the field. What is your decision?

A: You cannot send him off the field, only his captain can do that, but you can prevent him from bowling for the rest of the innings if he infringes again after two formal warnings.


Q74: A batter is dismissed on the last ball before lunch. After lunch the players return to the field but before they take their positions it rains heavily and they return to the pavilion. After a break of twenty minutes the players return to the field but the new batter is different from the one who walked out after lunch. The fielding team complains. What is your decision?

A: You should allow the batter change. Because ‘play’ wasn’t called for the resumption of play the batting team can change the new batter.


Q75: (Law 32.2): The ball hits a batter on the pad plumb in front of the wicket, then catches the edge of the bat and travels on to the stumps, knocking off a bail. The ball then pops up into the air and is caught by the wicketkeeper who noticing the batter is out of his ground, knocks off the other bail. The fielding team appeals. Your umpiring partner has his finger up for stumped. What does the bowling end umpire do?

A: He should signal to the batter that he is out, then tell the scorers that the batter is out ‘bowled’. If the batter is out in more than one way off the same ball and bowled is one of the methods of dismissal then bowled takes precedence.


Q76: (Law 20.4.2.6): A wicketkeeper, suffering from hay fever sneezes loudly just as the ball is bowled. The distracted batter is bowled. What is your decision?

A: Not out! The batter was clearly distracted. The umpire should react quickly and call ‘dead ball’. The ball will not count in that over and should be re-bowled.


Q77: (Law 37.1.1): A batter plays a defensive stroke and the ball bounces at his feet, spins backwards and nudges the off stump. Just as the bail starts to move the batter presses it back into place with his bat. What is your decision?

A: Out! The method of dismissal is ‘obstructing the field’. A batter cannot prevent the dislodging of a bail off a legitimate delivery.


Q78: (Law 31.4): A batter plays at a ball which cannons into his front pad and is brilliantly caught by the short leg fielder. The fielding team appeals for the catch. You are in doubt whether the ball hit the bat but are convinced the batter is out LBW. What should you do?

A: Give the batter out, then signal to the scorers that it was LBW, not caught.


Q79: (Law 20.1.2): A batter shoulders arms to a delivery which passes through to the wicketkeeper. The batter hold the pose for a few seconds then loses his balance and knocks off the bails with his bat. The ball is still in the wicketkeeper’s gloves. The fielding team appeals. What is your decision?

A: Not out! You would consider the ball ‘dead’ because of the length of time that elapsed before the bails were knocked off. Neither team was looking for any further action before the bails were dislodged.


Q80: (Law 28.4): A left arm bowler bowls around the wicket to a right hand batter. There are two close catchers behind square leg. The wicketkeeper takes up his position on the leg side of the stumps. The batters claim it is a ‘no ball’ because three players are behind square leg. What is your decision?

A: It is not a no ball. The wicketkeeper is exempt from this law.


Q81: (Law 41.17): As the bowler starts a very long run-up to deliver the ball, the batters decide to quickly steal a run as the bowler approaches the wicket. The non-facing batter then hammers the delivery for four. What is your decision?

A: Attempting to steal a run during the bowler’s run-up is unfair play. The four runs will not count. You will call ‘dead ball’ and return the batters to their original ends. You will award five penalty runs to the fielding side and report both batters to the proper authority at the conclusion of the match.


Q82: (Law 34.3): A lifting delivery strikes the batter on the upper arm, lands on the ground and spins back towards the stumps. The batter hits the ball away from his stumps and the ball is caught on the full by the point fielder. The fielding team appeals. What is your decision?

A: Not out. The batter cannot be given out caught as he hit the ball after it bounced on the second strike. The batter can only be given out caught on the second strike if the ball has not touched the ground before he hits it. He is not out ‘hit the ball twice’ as he was legally defending his wicket.


Q83: (Law 2.2): Your fellow umpire is having a poor game, having made a number of poor decisions. Both captains approach you at the lunch interval asking for him to be replaced by another umpire who is a spectator at the match. What is your decision?

A: The umpire cannot be replaced, despite his poor performance, because the ‘extraordinary circumstances’ that allow an umpire to be replaced, such as illness or injury, have not been met.


Q84: (Law 24.1.2): A fielder is injured and is replaced by the twelfth man. Soon after the wicketkeeper is injured. The twelfth man starts to put on the wicketkeeper’s gear but the batters object. What is your decision?

A: You tell the fielding captain that the twelfth man cannot act as wicketkeeper. He must be replaced by one of the eleven nominated players, unless the batting captain agrees to allow the twelfth man to act as wicketkeeper. may act as a replacement wicketkeeper (Law Change from October 2017).


Q85: (Laws 27.3/27.4): A batter complains that the wicketkeeper is standing too close, leaning over the stumps until the bowler’s delivery stride, thereby preventing him from playing cut shots. He insists that you ask the wicketkeeper to stop this practice. What is your decision?

A: Dismiss the batter’s complaint. As the wicketkeeper does not have any part of his person or equipment in front of the stumps at the point of delivery, the wicketkeeper is not doing anything ‘illegal’. It is up to the wicketkeeper to make sure he does not get hit by the bat while the batter is playing a stroke.


Q86: (Law 2.9): A fast bowler, who delivers the ball close to the stumps, asks you to move to the side and three steps back from where you would normally stand as your current position is distracting and hindering him in his bowling delivery stride. How do you react to this request?

A: Deny the request. You need to stand directly in line with the stumps to accurately judge LBW’s and in the best decision to look for front-foot no balls.


Q87: (Law 33.2): A fielder takes a catch near the boundary, but in celebrating, throws the ball in the air and over the boundary. The batter claims he is not out and should be awarded four runs as the fielder did not have full control of the ball. What is your decision?

A: You have to decide whether the fielder had full control of the ball before throwing it in the air. If yes, out. If no, not out and four six runs.